Parting the Red Sea


One of the stories learned/retold to my K5 kids is the story of the Red Sea. This story is so amazing, and my imagination gets away from me. I usually share with the class, “I wonder if you could see the fish swimming through the walls of water just like you would see the fish through the glass at the Georgia Aquarium.” In this miracle were other little miracles: God himself (a pillar of fire by day and a pillar of a cloud by night) keeping the Egyptian soldiers from seeing the Israelites cross the Red Sea, the Israelites crossing the Red Sea on dry ground, the power of God holding back the walls of water, the wheels falling off of the Egyptian’s chariots to stop their pursuit, and at just the right time, the waters swallowing up the Egyptian soldiers, horses, and chariots. The Israelites’ mouths had to drop open at the power of all that they had just witnessed.

Why did this happen on such a grand scale? So that from Exodus 14:13, they would “see the salvation of the Lord” or believe God. He promised to be with them and to care for them. He had promised them this since the time of Abraham. It says in verse 31, “And Israel saw that great work which the Lord did upon the Egyptians: and the people feared the Lord, and believed the Lord, and his servant Moses.”

Moses would remind them of this miracle throughout the whole journey to the Promised Land. Other nations would hear of this story and become afraid of the God of Israel. If the Israelites had rehearsed and meditated more often on God’s power and care that they saw demonstrated at the Red Sea, wouldn’t there possibly have been a lot less complaining when food and water ran out?

How has God been powerful or provided for you in an amazing way? Why do you think he wanted you to witness that care and power? To help you believe him and his promises for the next obstacle you face. Think back and rehearse God’s power and care and this will help you “go forward” (from verse 15) when you face your next Red Sea.

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